Monday, May 9, 2011

The universal (final) proof of this new etymology


With the previous posts, the universal (final) proof of this new etymology is, now, complete for the following three premises,
1. Premise one --- All (each and every) Chinese words (characters) are composed of from a set of word roots,

2. Premise two --- The meaning of all Chinese words can be read out from their faces,

3. Premise three --- The pronunciation of all Chinese words can be read out from their faces.

Universal proof --- for an arbitrary selected Chinese character, the three premises above are true and valid.

That is, you (the reader) can arbitrarily select a Chinese character, and it will be encompassed by the three premises above. This is, in fact, a challenge to the world to select a word arbitrarily for this universal proof.

Now, I will repeat the existential introduction and existential generalization with the following examples as the first step.

A. The existential introduction and existential generalization for the premises.
(gòu, enough) = 多  (unlimited many)  +  句 (a completed sentence or  to end),  to end the unlimited many means enough. 句 (gōu) is the explicit sound tag.

該 (gāi, should be or ought to) is 言 (speech or words) + 亥 (essence). The essential words are the words which should be obeyed. 亥 (hài) is the explicit sound tag.

睡 (shuì, sleep or sleepy)   =   目 (eyes)     +  垂  (droop or droopy). 垂 (chuí) is the explicit sound tag.

間 (jiān, gap)  =  門 (door) over 日 (Sun), there is a gap when seeing  Sunlight through the door. 見 (jiàn, seeing) is the implicit sound tag.

盲 (máng, blind) is 亡 (lost or dead) 目 (eyes), 忙 (máng, busy) is the implicit sound tag.

B. Most of the following words are parts of the mutated system. I am giving them out here as some tests for the readers.

1. 乎,
2. 姊, ,
3. 前, ,
4. 叔,
5. 卬
6. 攸 ,
7. 最
8. 鏡

Of course, you can always select a word of your own as the challenge for this universal proof.

Tienzen (Jeh-Tween) Gong

3 comments:

  1. Very interesting post, once again. Do all characters work this way, tho?

    There are almost always exceptions to the rule, aren't there? How about very simple characters like 日 or 不... how do they work within these universal rules.

    The term "face" in points 2/3 is not clear in english. I'd like to help you find a more appropriate word.


    Cheers,

    Brad

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  2. Dear Brad:

    "Do all characters work this way, tho?

    There are almost always exceptions to the rule, aren't there?"

    The Chinese character set, now, has two systems,
    a. the original axiomatic system,
    b. a mutated system.
    Please read the post 33 ( http://chineselanguageetymology.blogspot.com/2011/05/mutations-of-chinese-characters.html )

    日 is a root, the simplest particle.

    不 is 一 (heaven or heaven's chi) over 下 (below) while the radical 下 is rotated 45 degree. The static scene is a bird touching the heaven and not coming down (下). The decoding is "No," not coming down.

    There is a related word 至 (arrived) which is 不 (not coming down) over 土 (earth). Thus, 至 means "landed". Please note that the center stroke of 不 turned 90 degree.

    In general, when a referring logic works only to a single word, it cannot be sure as a internal consistent logic. However, when it works for a group words, it will be valid.

    Thank you for your comment.

    Tienzen (Jeh-Tween) Gong

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  3. Thanks for your reply, Tien zen (哪一个字?)

    Fascinating etymology of 不, and had it links into 到. I'll definitely check out post 33, and a number of others. Great posts. Very interesting to me. Cheers, Brad

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